Disabled Pelsall fundraiser becomes first hand cyclist to complete the Trans Peninne Trail

A disabled Pelsall fundraiser has pedalled his way into the history books by becoming the first ever hand cyclist to complete the Trans Pennine Trail.

Andrew Moult, Bret Taylor from sponsor: Russell Cycles, Richard Worrall and Condessa Parke
Andrew Moult, Bret Taylor from sponsor: Russell Cycles, Richard Worrall and Condessa Parke

Andrew Moult, agachievement is all the more remarkable after he rode 20 miles in the wrong direction after some Northern practical jokers turned a vital road sign the wrong way.

The wheelchair bound 63-year-old and his team of one fellow cyclist and two support staff rode 245 miles in four days between Southport on the Irish Sea and Hornsea on North Sea.

The epic challenge also raised more than £1,100 for Shine, the charity which helps people with spina bifida, hydrocephalus and anencephaly.

He said: "It was tough going especially when it came to hills with a gradient of 1,10 but I am pleased I am the first person to hand pedal the Trans Pennine Trail. It is much harder going uphill hand pedalling than on a normal bicycle.

"The day when we rode 20 miles in the wrong direction due to signs being turned around was really hard. I think it was done by children but it was not very funny at the time."

He added: "My team were fantastic and really helped when the going got tough, riding 60 miles a day is never easy. But I wanted to raise money for spina bifida charity Shine and so far we have got £1,145.

"I promised my sister I would do a challenge for her after seeing what she has gone through all her life and was put in contact with Shine, they are only charity in the country which helps people with spina bifida."

Andrew's team included Steve Price from Walsall Bike Project and his partner Penn Harris, with two support drivers travelling behind them.

Mr Moult hoped his success could inspire disabled to take up cycling as a way of exercising.

He said: "It would be nice to get more people with disabilities back out on their bikes, I was 24 stone when I started and I'm now 18 and a half stone and it's great when you're out there and meeting people and getting that endorphin rush."

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