Express & Star

Urban artistic expression or illegal eyesores? See 36 eye-popping photos of Wolverhampton's graffiti

These eye-catching photos show a glimpse into the gritty underbelly of Wolverhampton.

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From empty buildings packed with memories of industry long-gone to the looming underpass and the winding alleyways covered in art, this city has become a hotbed for graffiti – both legal and illegal.

So is this urban art representative of a modern creative melting pot, or is it a nuisance criminal damage that is a blight on the already rundown landscape?

For context – graffiti is art that is written, painted or drawn on a wall or other surface, usually without permission and within public view.

It is a widespread cultural phenomenon across the globe ever since it began nearly 60 years ago and is still either loved or hated by residents or visitors alike.

Some street artists, such as Banksy, have made their way to fame through their illegal art, and more often than not the media focuses on the vandalism aspect of the work.

Our photographer Tim Thursfield visited some of the most well-known spots across Wolverhampton.

Around Peel Street

Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street
Around Peel Street