Verdict expected on historic industrial site

A decision on the future of a historic industrial site is expected to be announced by a government minister in the next two weeks.

A decision on the future of a historic industrial site is expected to be announced by a government minister in the next two weeks.

An application to put homes on land in Tipton credited as being the birthplace of the world's first steam engine was thrown out, but Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government Hazel Blears has a final say, after an appeal.

The land is between factory units and the Newcomen housing estate. The application was originally thrown out because the estate and surrounding land is currently reserved for industrial use, meaning that homes cannot be built.

Further investigation was done after landowners Mintworth Transport launched the appeal. Tipton Green ward councillor Ian Jones said he believed the site should be preserved due to its famous past. He said: "The historical significance of this site should not be underplayed.

"We know from history that the Newcomen steam engine was built on this site and there is evidence to show there was an 18th century pumphouse there as well.

"We should have a response by the end of April and I hope that this upholds the original decision to refuse any housing development at the site."

He is hoping that if the appeal is unsuccessful the council should consider extending the Tipton Factory Locks conservation area to protect the site from any future development.

This conservation area currently covers land between Telford's New Main Line section of the Birmingham and Wolverhampton Canal.

Sorry, we are not accepting comments on this article.

Top Stories

More from the Express & Star

UK & International News