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BBC ‘guilty of omission of facts’

Readers' letters | Published:

The BBC are fond of pointing out the modern-day menace of ‘fake news’. However, they are less keen on pointing out their own failings in this area. Perhaps a few recent examples will illustrate my point.

Naz Smith, the Labour MP for Bradford West, recently shared a twitter message which called for the sexual abuse victims from Rotherham to ‘shut their mouths for the good of diversity’.

Given that Mrs Shah was instrumental in the attack on fellow Labour MP Sarah Champion when she made clear who was involved in the industrial scale of abuse one might think the BBC would be interested.

Remember the hours of coverage when Tory MP Anne Marie Morris used a phrase which is no longer PC, she was suspended from the party. Fake news by omission and bias is clear.

The London School of Economics recently reported a major post Brexit survey. This showed that 67 per cent of respondents favoured outcomes that the BBC usually term ‘Hard Brexit’, these included people who had voted remain. It was a large sample of over 3,000. Did the BBC report this? No they omitted to tell you since it did not fit with their anti-Brexit agenda. One small example of many. If you search the internet you can find many more.

The BBC are keen to report the fall in applications for nursing posts from the EU since Brexit.

They are less keen to tell you the raw figures and less keen still to give two important reasons. Firstly, the introduction of tougher English language tests, secondly the fall in the pound means jobs in the UK are less attractive for EU nationals.

The end result is that the Government intends to train more of our own nurses rather than steal them from poorer EU Nations.

These are just a few examples of how the BBC produces fake news, by omission of key facts, by putting guests on and not revealing what their political agenda or background might be.

All that fake news and you are forced by law to pay for it and the huge salaries paid to BBC managers and so-called ‘talent’.

John Stretton, Albrighton

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