Homes plan on site of former Halfway House pub in Tettenhall set to be agreed

A housing development earmarked for land behind a historic former Wolverhampton pub look set to be approved, despite opposition from councillors.

An artist's impression of proposed homes that could be built behind the Halfway House in Tettenhall, Wolverhampton. Photo: Stephen George & Partners
An artist's impression of proposed homes that could be built behind the Halfway House in Tettenhall, Wolverhampton. Photo: Stephen George & Partners

Wolverhampton Council’s planning committee will discuss the proposal for nine new homes behind the old Halfway House on Tettenhall Road, when it meets on September 15.

Officers are recommending members grant permission for the scheme, which has been put forward by developers Lyric Ltd.

But the plans have provoked a number of objections, including issues raised by councillors Claire Darke and Dr Michael Hardacre.

Concerns include the proposed houses being inappropriate for the conservation area the site sits in, fears the access to the site off Paget Road will create highways problems and over-development of the site.

The Halfway House dates back to at least 1842 and the developers said it was used as a staging post between London and Holyhead.

The pub closed a number of years ago and became a dentist but the land behind, where the houses are proposed, has not been redeveloped.

Lyric Ltd said the design of the homes being put forward are sympathetic to the Tettenhall Road Conservation Area (TRCA).

A report to committee said: "The TRCA is generally characterised by large 19th century buildings or terraces fronting Tettenhall Road.

"The scale of the proposed buildings would complement that of the other nearby buildings in the TRCA and additionally would be largely screened by a row of protected Lime trees on the Tettenhall Road frontage.

“"he scale of the development would relate appropriately with the locally listed building, and a sufficient separation distance exists between the new housing and the Halfway House, such that the setting of this locally listed building would not be adversely affected.

"There would be sufficient in-curtilage vehicle parking to accommodate the likely demand for resident parking.

"The proposals also include satisfactory separate parking for customers and staff of the Halfway House businesses.

"Although visibility onto the road from the existing access is poor, the development would not be likely to cause any greater harm to highway safety."

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