Tree planting at Sutton Coldfield's Manorial Wood as part of Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee

Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust was joined by the local community to plant a Yew tree at Manorial Wood, as part of the Queen’s Canopy tree planting initiative to mark her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee.

L to R: 'Terry Wood planting the Yew Tree with Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust Chair of Trustees, Chief Executive, almshouse residents, Little Sutton Primary School children, West Midlands Police Cadets at Manorial Wood for the Queen’s Jubilee Canopy Initiative in Sutton Coldfield.'
L to R: 'Terry Wood planting the Yew Tree with Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust Chair of Trustees, Chief Executive, almshouse residents, Little Sutton Primary School children, West Midlands Police Cadets at Manorial Wood for the Queen’s Jubilee Canopy Initiative in Sutton Coldfield.'

Chairman of Sutton in Bloom Terry Wood joined SCCT staff and Keith Dudley, Chair of Trustees to plant the commemorative Yew tree, as well of two long-serving almshouse residents, children from Little Sutton Primary School, West Midlands Police Cadets and two local chartered foresters.

Tina Swani, chief executive of Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust, said: “It's fantastic that we were able to be part of the Queen’s Canopy planting at Manorial Wood, and what a great way to mark the Platinum Jubilee.

“We’d like to thank everyone who was involved in the project and for helping us plant the Yew tree, which will be here and part of Sutton Coldfield for generations to come.”

The tree planting commemorated a significant milestone in the Queen’s reign, celebrating 70 years on the throne, and within that time the Trust - which has origins that can be traced back to the Tudor times – has achieved its own milestones that align with royal events.

The Royal Charter established the Royal Town of Sutton Coldfield in 1528, during the reign of Henry VIII.

Four years before Elizabeth I was born, the first ever almshouses were also built at a total cost of £608.

L to R: 'Terry Wood planting the Yew Tree with Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust Chair of Trustees, Chief Executive, almshouse residents, Little Sutton Primary School children, West Midlands Police Cadets at Manorial Wood for the Queen’s Jubilee Canopy Initiative in Sutton Coldfield.'

In 1558, Queen Elizabeth came to the throne, when Royal Town Sutton Coldfield was celebrating its 30th birthday.

In 1926, 10 Almshouses in Walmley were being built, just as Queen Elizabeth II had been born and electricity was installed three years later.

And in 1971, Princess Anne opened a new Residents’ Lounge and 13 dwellings on Walmley site. Trustees decided to rent a TV and buy a piano for the lounge.

The Silver Jubilee in 1977 saw Sutton Coldfield officially became part of the city of Birmingham. #

The Ruby Jubilee in 1992 saw the Trust hit the £1 million mark for grants awarded that year. This is the first time the Trust granted this amount of money, which was a total of £1,357,163 to help individuals and organisations across Sutton Coldfield.

And the Diamond Jubilee of 2012 saw the name of the Trust changed to Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust, to reflect the Trust’s role more appropriately, within the town, as an independent charity which no longer has a direct association with the local authority.

To find out more information about Sutton Coldfield Charitable Trust, please visit suttoncoldfieldcharitabletrust.com/alms-houses

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