Eid al-Fitr: Muslims across region prepare to break fast

“It’s a month to cleanse yourself and make the changes needed for you as a person.”

The end of Ramadan and celebration of Eid-ul-Fitr brings people together in prayer, with outdoor events popular in some cities
The end of Ramadan and celebration of Eid-ul-Fitr brings people together in prayer, with outdoor events popular in some cities

Muslims across the region have been reflecting over the last year as the Islamic holy month of Ramadan comes to an end and Eid al-Fitr takes place.

Eid al-Fitr takes place from Thursday to Friday, marking the end of a month of sacrifice and observance.

The last month has seen fasting during daylight hours and acts of charity, as well as commemorating how the holy Quran was first revealed to the prophet Mohammed.

Among those fasting and reflecting has been Ramadan Radio station manager and broadcaster Alvina Ali, who spoke about the significance of Ramadan. She said: “What the holy month does is help me as a Muslim to spiritually reflect over the year, to pray and to make myself a bit better.

“We don’t know if we are doing any wrongdoings, so it’s a month to cleanse ourselves and prepare for the life after.”

Ms Ali said another important part of the period was performing acts of charity, with Ramadan Radio raising £5,462.25 for the Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals Charity Trust.

Demonstrating charity or Alms is part of the five pillars of Islam, with the other four being profession of faith, prayer, fasting and pilgrimage.

The holy month concludes with Eid al-Fitr, meaning the end of fasting and a time for celebration – and Ms Ali explained what went into the Eid celebrations.

She said: “It involves most of the community going to mosques and reciting a prayer on the first morning of the festival, with some outdoor events also happening.

“After that, everybody sits down together with families and friends and the first daylight meal is taken to commemorate the end of the fasting, with three days of celebrations.

“It’s a time where we get to see our families and stay connected, as well as the younger generation exchanging gifts and everyone celebrating it joyously.”

Ms Ali said it was also a way to continue carrying out kind deeds, saying the relevant prayers and simply doing the right things in day to day life.

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