Revealed: Black Country areas most at risk from climate change impact

The parts of the Black Country that stand to be hardest hit by climate change have been revealed in a new study.

A report commissioned by the West Midlands Combined Authority says climate change could have a devastating impact on businesses, infrastructure and people's health in the years ahead.

The research predicts the impact on the region of severe flooding, water scarcity and more intense and prolonged heatwaves.

And it highlights the areas that are likely to be hardest hit.

In the Black Country they include north Wolverhampton, with areas such as Bushbury, Oxley and Fallings Park expected to suffer most due to existing levels of deprivation, the high risk of flooding and the high proportion of vulnerable residents.

In Walsall, Streetly and parts of Aldridge would be hardest hit according to the report, while in Sandwell under-threat areas include Friar Park, Great Barr and West Bromwich.

The region declared a climate emergency in 2019 and has pledged to reach net zero by 2041. Last year a five-year plan was published aimed at ensuring the West Midlands is prepared for the impact of climate change.

West Midlands Mayor Andy Street, said: "As we seek to tackle the climate emergency, a recent UN report has warned that current global policies are not sufficient to keep us on track for the 1.5°C target signed up to at the Paris Agreement in 2015.

"We have all seen the alarming frequency and intensity of extreme weather events in recent years which only serves to confirm the importance of adapting to the changing climate.

"Our net zero commitment demonstrates our level of ambition when it comes to mitigating the impact of climate change.

"As part of our devolution deal discussions with Government, we’re seeking more funding and responsibility in order to establish a regional framework that will help to coordinate climate adaptation activity - working with local communities to co-create the solutions we need."

The report also warns of the "knock on" effects of climate change to businesses, saying it could disrupt supply chains leading to rising costs.

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