A piece of Black Country landscape returns

The 20th century saw a decline in coal mining in the Black Country.

A piece of Black Country landscape returns

The 20th century saw a decline in coal mining in the Black Country.

Spoil banks, waste from a coal mine or open coal pit were a typical feature on Black Country landscapes until 1968 when the closure of Baggeridge Colliery in Sedgley marked the end of an era of some 300 years of mass coal mining in the region.

The banks, once a familiar blot on the scenery, soon disappeared. But thanks to London and Cambridge property in Pensnett, 200 tons of Black Country landscape has been brought to life.

On arrival at its new home at the Black Country Living Museum, the 200 tons of tokie took several days for it to be spread and shaped.

Anyone wishing to capture the scenery of days gone by can do so by visiting the museum.

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