Djokovic feared worst after fall

Novak Djokovic admitted he feared his Wimbledon campaign was over when damaging his left shoulder in a "scary fall" during his third-round win over Gilles Simon.

Novak Djokovic feared the worst when he injured his shoulder
Novak Djokovic feared the worst when he injured his shoulder

The 2011 champion landed awkwardly after diving for a volley midway through the third set against the world number 44 on Centre Court on Friday, recovering to win out 6-4 6-2 6-4.

Djokovic conceded he thought he had dislocated his shoulder, hearing a "click or pop", but medics have since given the 27-year-old the all-clear.

The six-time grand slam winner will face Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the last 16, thankful of a two-day break for slight muscle pain to subside.

"It was obviously a scary fall," said the Serbian. "I tried to land on my left arm.

"That split-second was not pleasant: I definitely feared I could be out of the tournament.

"I basically had a strong impact on the shoulder: when I stood up I felt that click or pop, whatever you call it.

"I feared maybe it might be a dislocated shoulder, something like that, or a joint problem.

"Luckily for me it was only an impact that had a minor effect on the joint and the muscles around, but no damage that can cause a bigger problem.

"I just came from the doctor's office, after an ultrasound, it's all looking good.

"There is no major damage so I'm quite confident it won't affect my physical state or daily routine.

"They told me I might feel soreness in the next couple of days, but I can play around with practices and recovery and see how it goes.

"Luckily for me it's all positive news - the doctor started moving and analysing my shoulder on court. Going out like that would be the worst way to exit a tournament."

Djokovic's relief at avoiding serious injury even afforded him the chance to joke about seeking diving practice with coach and one-time master of the volley Boris Becker.

"I talked with Boris - we obviously need to work on my diving volleys, learning how to fall down on the court," laughed Djokovic.

French Open finalist Djokovic eased past erratic Frenchman Simon with little issue, save his own wayward focus.

The top seed admitted he will seek to tighten up his game ahead of far tougher tests to come.

"There are things in my game I would like to improve in a few days and see if I can do better in the next match," he said.

"I definitely need to gear up before the next match against Tsonga, which is a great challenge.

"I hope I'll elevate my game as the tournament progresses. If I don't do that, then I'll find myself in a very difficult position."

Brushing off the slippery Centre Court baseline as expected in Wimbledon's first week, Dojokvic said three-time All England Club champion Becker is helping him hone his mental approach.

"Generally where he helps me the most and where I feel the biggest change is from a mental point of view.

"Obviously it's going to take a little bit of time for us to find the perfect balance and the work that we have will reflect on the court with results.

"We already have now couple titles together. We have finals of French Open. It's already starting to build up. I start to feel the effect of his advices and his presence.

"I'm a different player than what he was in terms of play. But in terms of mental approach and a couple of other things, I find that we have a lot of things in common.

"That's where I always look forward to talk with him and to get this necessary experience from him and use it in my own case."