Teach money in primary school call

The first year of secondary school is too late for children to start learning about money, a survey of teachers has found.

Financial education will be taught as part of mathematics and citizenship education from September
Financial education will be taught as part of mathematics and citizenship education from September

Nine in 10 teachers surveyed for financial education charity pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group) do not think the Government has gone far enough by making it compulsory to teach secondary school children how to manage money.

From September, financial education will be taught as part of mathematics and citizenship education. It is the first time financial education will be placed on the national curriculum in secondary schools across England, but it does not affect primary schools or academies and free schools.

Some 83% of teachers said money skills should be taught at primary school level to be most effective, and 70% are seeing evidence that children are encountering financial decisions earlier in life than they used to.

Tracey Bleakley, pfeg chief executive, said: "Every school - whether primary or secondary, maintained, academy or free school - should be teaching its pupils how to manage money.

"Until we reach this point, we are failing in our responsibility as a society to prepare young people for the challenges they will face throughout their adult lives."

The survey of 770 teachers conducted in April and May marks the start of pfeg's My Money Week which runs until June 15, allowing thousands of schools to put on money lessons and other activities.